Orange Peel

Lylliths' Emporium

$2.10 

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SKU: HRB-ORANGEPL-10

Orange, sweet - dried fruit peel 10g

  • Botanical Name: Citrus sinensis
  • Folk Names: Love fruit
  • Gender: Masculine
  • Planet: Sun
  • Element: Fire
  • Powers: Joy and Happiness, Love, divination, luck and money
  • Deities: Jupiter, Leo, Sun Gods, Yule God

Magickal Uses: Orange peel is useful lifting the spirits and to find direction, dealing with obsessive thinking and over thinking. It is used as offerings, incense and decoration at Yule.

Orange peel is often added to love sachets, bath waters, prosperity and success sachets, incenses and powders. 

*when using in incense, it may be best to add warm spices to create a more pleasant scent or try adding a few pieces to some water in an oil burner instead.

Orange peel and whole Oranges can be used to symbolize Gold on your Altar during money spells.

Healing Properties: Sweet orange is used mostly in herbal tea blends but also in it's essential oil form in aromatherapy.

Sweet orange is used to treat insomnia, depression, as an aphrodesiac, anxiety and stress, digestive systom, colds and flu (to prevent), bloating, menstral cramps and is also useful in cleaning products.

Whilst eating oranges or juicing them is wonderful and best suited for cooking with sweet orange, the majority of citrus farmers need to use pesticides to avoid fruit flies and other pesky insects making the peels potentially unsafe even after washing (unless growing your own of course).

Organic dried peel is recommended for herbal teas and tonics. (Our peel is organic and safe for teas)

 

 

*Our herbs are packaged in little plastic ziplock bags with labels

Medicinal information is provided as educational reference only and Lylliths' Emporium is not responsible for misuse or self-treatment. Always seek advice from a professional, licensed medical practitioner.

Information Sourced From: Cunninghams' Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs, Scott Cunningham. Wikipedia, www.anniesremedy.com, www.herbs2000.com, www.witchipedia.com, And our own private collection of grimoires and herbal lore, along with experiences working with herbs